What Exactly is Bounce Rate?

What Exactly is Bounce Rate?

We often hear about “bounce rate” when analyzing website traffic, but the term is often misleading or confusing. Is bounce rate good or bad? What should my bounce rate be? What does the term even mean?

Bounce rate, not to be confused with exit rate, refers to the percentage of single-page sessions or sessions in which a person leaves your site from the entrance page without interacting with that page. An instance may be someone who visits your site and leaves immediately because of a slow-loading homepage. Or that person may have found the information they needed and promptly left.

So how is bounce rate good (low) and bad (high)? It is “measured” in percentage with a higher bounce rate being bad and a lower bounce rate being better. One reason it could be high is that you might be acquiring the wrong kind of traffic to your site. Or you might be acquiring the right kind of traffic. Confused about the good and bad?

Think about it…if you’re giving your customers all the information they need on the homepage, what incentive is there for them to navigate the rest of the website? We juggle between giving too much information and not enough, but it’s important to keep our customers or clients engaged.

So how can we avoid a high bounce rate? A few simple steps are to keep your website load-time down, which means optimizing your images, fixing any broken links, avoiding pop-ups. Another way is to think wisely about your design – do you have too many banner ads? Is your copy in white over a dark background? Is your site mobile-friendly? These things can affect how long someone stays on your site before leaving.

We often hear about “bounce rate” when analyzing website traffic, but the term is often misleading or confusing. Is bounce rate good or bad? What should my bounce rate be? What does the term even mean?

Bounce rate, not to be confused with exit rate, refers to the percentage of single-page sessions or sessions in which a person leaves your site from the entrance page without interacting with that page. An instance may be someone who visits your site and leaves immediately because of a slow-loading homepage. Or that person may have found the information they needed and promptly left.

So how is bounce rate good (low) and bad (high)? It is “measured” in percentage with a higher bounce rate being bad and a lower bounce rate being better. One reason it could be high is that you might be acquiring the wrong kind of traffic to your site. Or you might be acquiring the right kind of traffic. Confused about the good and bad?

Think about it…if you’re giving your customers all the information they need on the homepage, what incentive is there for them to navigate the rest of the website? We juggle between giving too much information and not enough, but it’s important to keep our customers or clients engaged.

So how can we avoid a high bounce rate? A few simple steps are to keep your website load-time down, which means optimizing your images, fixing any broken links, avoiding pop-ups. Another way is to think wisely about your design – do you have too many banner ads? Is your copy in white over a dark background? Is your site mobile-friendly? These things can affect how long someone stays on your site before leaving.

To read more tips and tricks, and because I don’t want a high bounce rate for this post (!), click to read the article called “Reduce Bounce Rate :20 Things to Consider.”

Why You Need a Website for Your Business

Why You Need a Website for Your Business

In this age of social media becoming more of a marketing tool, is it wise to have a website for your business? The answer, of course, is yes. Social media is everywhere and accessible to everyone, but you don’t own your content within those channels. Your website is your credibility for what you do, what you want to sell, and how to present yourself to current and potential customers.

Clients tend to waver back and forth as to whether or not it’s worth the time and money to have a website designed. I often tell them to think of a website as their home base. When they use social media, it’s wise to always link back to their website. This home base lends to the credibility that you’re not just some fly-by-night company with no credentials. A website shows your public that you do exist – providing contact information, examples of work, or even downloads. As a matter of fact, a high percentage of potential customers check a company’s website before doing any business with them.

A website helps in Google search rankings. Let’s face it – everyone talks about wanting to be on the first page of a Google search page, but who actually spends the time trying to meet the criteria? Is it even possible? I tell my clients that I can only give them the tools to help with SEO. With Google’s ever changing algorithm, it may be next to impossible. The key is to create the juiciest content – using keywords, credible links, quality over quantity content.

The most important thing to consider when you are thinking about a website – (insert self-promotion here) – is to hire a website specialist who knows the tools, has the knowledge and creativity, and the ability to educate you, the client, on the best approach to creating your home base. With the thousands of online options available including hosting packages, website themes, website plugins, etc., how does one navigate through the sea of website design?

The answer is simple…contact 26point2designs…we’ll help you navigate the website waters!

In this age of social media becoming more of a marketing tool, is it wise to have a website for your business? The answer, of course, is yes. Social media is everywhere and accessible to everyone, but you don’t own your content within those channels. Your website is your credibility for what you do, what you want to sell, and how to present yourself to current and potential customers.

Clients tend to waver back and forth as to whether or not it’s worth the time and money to have a website designed. I often tell them to think of a website as their home base. When they use social media, it’s wise to always link back to their website. This home base lends to the credibility that you’re not just some fly-by-night company with no credentials. A website shows your public that you do exist – providing contact information, examples of work, or even downloads. As a matter of fact, a high percentage of potential customers check a company’s website before doing any business with them.

unblock_websitesA website helps in Google search rankings. Let’s face it – everyone talks about wanting to be on the first page of a Google search page, but who actually spends the time trying to meet the criteria? Is it even possible? I tell my clients that I can only give them the tools to help with SEO. With Google’s ever changing algorithm, it may be next to impossible. The key is to create the juiciest content – using keywords, credible links, quality over quantity content.

The most important thing to consider when you are thinking about a website – (insert self-promotion here) – is to hire a website specialist who knows the tools, has the knowledge and creativity, and the ability to educate you, the client, on the best approach to creating your home base. With the thousands of online options available including hosting packages, website themes, website plugins, etc., how does one navigate through the sea of website design?

The answer is simple…contact 26point2designs…we’ll help you navigate the website waters!

Traits You Need to Become More Influential

Traits You Need to Become More Influential

We all want to make a difference in the world and feel better in doing so. What makes that so difficult is figuring out how to be the best at everything you do. Is that even possible?

What I think is possible is developing traits to help you become a better person, and the same holds true in your profession. When I create a logo, I don’t expect myself to come up with the perfect design on the first time. It takes patience, thought, skill and time…things I seem to have a lack of from time to time. I know that the logo I am creating needs to mesh with the client, their vision and their branding. It needs to be influential, but in order to be influential, I need to possess those traits. In order to be that influence, I need to do better or at least pretend I’m doing better!

2014 is the year I’m becoming more proactive – from networking to public speaking to my presentation about my work. These things don’t come easy to me, but with practice, I can be better and become more influential. Some simple traits include kindness, balancing, and preparation. Find¬†ways you can become more influential in your daily life, your hobbies (mine is running…duh!) and career.