Website Speed Testing

Website Speed Testing

Along with SEO, image optimization, and content management, website load time is just as important to improving your website. Visitors to your website have a short attention span and not only want the information they are looking for at their fingertips, but they want it fast.

What happens when they can’t get information in a timely manner? They leave your website…disappointed.

Below are some interesting facts about “page abandonment” and load time according to sitepoint:

  • 8% of potential buyers cite extremely slow loading web pages as the primary reason for abandoning their purchase.
  • Over 75% of online customers opted for a competitor’s site instead of suffering inordinate delays at peak traffic time.
  • If page load time is 3 seconds or more, 57% of your website visitors will abandon your page.
  • 75% of users exit within 4 seconds.
  • When compared to business websites that load in 1 second, websites that load in 3 seconds experience a 50% higher bounce rate, 22% fewer page views, and, most significantly, 22% fewer conversions.

Not to worry – there are plenty of tools to help test your website speed load time, and they are quite fun tools to use!

GT Metrix scores your website using graphics and load times within various locations across the globe. You can even download your results to a handy PDF.

WebPage Test offers your website a grade much like being tested in school: A – F. You can even watch a slow-motion load time of your homepage and view the statistics based on that load time.

Use these tools and consider the results when optimizing your website.

What Exactly is Bounce Rate?

What Exactly is Bounce Rate?

We often hear about “bounce rate” when analyzing website traffic, but the term is often misleading or confusing. Is bounce rate good or bad? What should my bounce rate be? What does the term even mean?

Bounce rate, not to be confused with exit rate, refers to the percentage of single-page sessions or sessions in which a person leaves your site from the entrance page without interacting with that page. An instance may be someone who visits your site and leaves immediately because of a slow-loading homepage. Or that person may have found the information they needed and promptly left.

So how is bounce rate good (low) and bad (high)? It is “measured” in percentage with a higher bounce rate being bad and a lower bounce rate being better. One reason it could be high is that you might be acquiring the wrong kind of traffic to your site. Or you might be acquiring the right kind of traffic. Confused about the good and bad?

Think about it…if you’re giving your customers all the information they need on the homepage, what incentive is there for them to navigate the rest of the website? We juggle between giving too much information and not enough, but it’s important to keep our customers or clients engaged.

So how can we avoid a high bounce rate? A few simple steps are to keep your website load-time down, which means optimizing your images, fixing any broken links, avoiding pop-ups. Another way is to think wisely about your design – do you have too many banner ads? Is your copy in white over a dark background? Is your site mobile-friendly? These things can affect how long someone stays on your site before leaving.

We often hear about “bounce rate” when analyzing website traffic, but the term is often misleading or confusing. Is bounce rate good or bad? What should my bounce rate be? What does the term even mean?

Bounce rate, not to be confused with exit rate, refers to the percentage of single-page sessions or sessions in which a person leaves your site from the entrance page without interacting with that page. An instance may be someone who visits your site and leaves immediately because of a slow-loading homepage. Or that person may have found the information they needed and promptly left.

So how is bounce rate good (low) and bad (high)? It is “measured” in percentage with a higher bounce rate being bad and a lower bounce rate being better. One reason it could be high is that you might be acquiring the wrong kind of traffic to your site. Or you might be acquiring the right kind of traffic. Confused about the good and bad?

Think about it…if you’re giving your customers all the information they need on the homepage, what incentive is there for them to navigate the rest of the website? We juggle between giving too much information and not enough, but it’s important to keep our customers or clients engaged.

So how can we avoid a high bounce rate? A few simple steps are to keep your website load-time down, which means optimizing your images, fixing any broken links, avoiding pop-ups. Another way is to think wisely about your design – do you have too many banner ads? Is your copy in white over a dark background? Is your site mobile-friendly? These things can affect how long someone stays on your site before leaving.

To read more tips and tricks, and because I don’t want a high bounce rate for this post (!), click to read the article called “Reduce Bounce Rate :20 Things to Consider.”